I’m the type who reviews my credit card statements and reconciles them with my receipts and online orders. Occasionally I run into puzzling issues and end up calling the vendor or credit card company to verify, clarify or challenge a mysterious charge on my bill. However, I hate wasting time on a customer service call (or chat), and would much rather solve the mystery myself when I can.

The Problem: Reconciling Credit Card Statements with Amazon Charges

Have you ever had a charge from Amazon.com on your credit card that doesn’t match any orders around the date that your card was charged? I’ve found a few common situations — and some clever ways to verify them without the bother of contacting Amazon customer service. This post is a way for me to remember the clever tricks I discover–and to share them with the world. ‘Cause I’m generous like that. You’re welcome. (Post last updated Sep 17, 2020; be sure to scan the comment section for more tips not included in the main article. THANK YOU to every commenter who lets me know when Amazon has changed their interface or who shares a great tip.)

tl;dr / The Easiest Way to Find Charges Matching Your Credit Card Statement

(Hint: It’s not the Amazon order reports)

(Post edited 10/30/2019 to add this tactic:) I’ve been updating this blog post for several years since I first posted it, as Amazon keeps changing their interface. In the end, this simple workaround is the most reliable way to get the information I need quickly:

Save every Amazon order shipping confirmation email that you receive.

Archive the emails if you want them out of your inbox, but save them. And then, when you find a rogue transaction from Amazon on your credit card statement, search for the exact dollar amount in your email archive. When you find it, the email should contain a link to the order details in your Amazon account (sadly, the emails don’t currently list the items and details), which you can use to verify things.

TO CLARIFY, based on feedback from a reader: In the text below I refer to Amazon charges “for shipments”. I’m not talking about Amazon charging “for shipping”, since most of us using Amazon regularly have Amazon Prime and get free shipping. I’m talking about the charge that goes on a credit card for the items in that shipment.

Scenario #1 – An item with an order date significantly distanced from its ship date (the credit card is usually charged when it ships)

Often, this is easily reconciled by looking at orders within 5 days before/after the credit card charge date. But if that doesn’t give you any orders that match the charge, try using their Request My Data feature. This used to be available under Your Account as “Download Order Reports”, but now (updated Sep 2020) it’s no longer available that way.

Use the dropdown to request data about Your Orders.

This will generate an email confirmation. When you receive the email, click the link to confirm your email address and generate the report. It says that it can take up to a month to receive the report (that’s awful!) but the first time I tried it the data was available the next day.

Amazon Data Download screen

Amazon provides the data in several .zip files, each containing one or more .CSV files (you can use MS Excel or Google Sheets to read them). After scanning through these files, here’s what I found:

  • The data download seems to contain every order for the entire history of my Amazon account (years of data).
  • Retail Order History and Subscriptions and Digital Order History seem the most useful.
  • There does not appear to be a column of data with the actual charge total, which I find astonishing. They list the item cost, the tax, the shipping cost (if any) — but don’t offer a total. So you can’t just search for the charge amount. Instead, use the charge date to find a similar shipping date and search the surrounding entries from there. This limitation (and the delay while waiting for the data to be delivered) is why I prefer keeping my Amazon confirmation emails and searching for the charge amount in my email archive.

If this data download doesn’t help, you can resort to Amazon’s email, phone or chat support options.

PRE-ORDERED E-BOOKS:

Pre-ordered e-books have proven quite tricky. Let’s say I pre-order an e-book on October 23 and the book is released December 3. Everything in my Amazon Order History for Digital Orders says October 23. The invoice, the order record, everything. And yet, my credit card is not charged until December 3.

While I’m thankful that they don’t charge me until they actually deliver it, it’s horrible that there is no record of that charge date anywhere related to my order. The only thing that helped me solve this scenario was clicking on the book title, which then tells me at the top of the page, “You purchased this item on December 3.” Well, that’s not exactly true, either, but at least the date is close enough to the credit card charge (and for the correct amount), so the mystery is solved. UPDATE (Sep 2020): The new “Request My Data” feature mentioned above has a download for Digital Order History, and this spreadsheet shows the order date AND the delivery date (which is usually within a day of the charge date), as well as the title, purchase amount, etc.

Scenario #2 – An order with multiple items that ship separately from each other

(This section updated 10/30/2019) Sometimes the confusion enters because of how Amazon groups the orders for shipping.

Let’s say you put in an order and the total is $79, but three items ship for a total of $36, and a week or two later another item ships for $17, and then a week after that the last item ships for $26. When you scan your orders, it’s possible you won’t find one on the date you expect it (close to the original order date) AND/OR you won’t find any orders at all with the $17 charge because of how Amazon summarizes the orders.

The best way I’ve found to illuminate this situation is to find an order that shows as having several separate ship dates (and one of them around the charge you’re reconciling), or several items grouped with the same delivery date.

Click on the Order Details button.

Amazon order details

Then either click on the Transactions link (to quickly check for credit card transactions) or the View/Print Invoice button, to see full details on what items shipped together on what dates, individual item prices, tax, and credit card transactions.

Amazon order details

The invoice will outline the charge for each part of the order as they shipped and clearly show at the bottom the exact credit card charge amounts associated with it and the dates they were charged (see below).

Amazon invoice summary

Scenario #3 – Recurring subscriptions

(Post edited 12/14/2016 to include this third scenario:) Another common oversight is recurring subscriptions. The annual Amazon Prime membership charge itself is one. Under “Orders” if you click on “Manage Prime Membership”, you can see the last payment date and the next time it’s due for renewal.

Check under “My Account > Digital Content” and review “Your Video Subscriptions” or “Your Digital Subscriptions” and see if the mystery credit charge shows up there. I don’t know why they don’t include these items in your downloadable report, but they didn’t as of the writing of this update. So if you have a monthly video subscription to a service like Acorn TV, it will be listed here for the months it was active, and you can view receipts to verify the amount.

I’m still a fan of Amazon.com

It’s not fun to find mysterious charges on your credit card statement. I hope this helps someone (or myself in the future) when troubleshooting an unknown charge from Amazon.com on a credit card.

That said, I really enjoy the convenience and excellent service that Amazon provides, and when I do need to get help from their customer service, I’ve always been impressed with their responsiveness and willingness to please me.

Have a tip to add? There are some good ones in the comments below, so keep reading if the above didn’t help!


63 Comments

Bubba Bubbalcious · at

See the multiple shipment order on “your orders”.

Click on “order details” next to “invoice”.

Click on “transactions to see the separated charges that match your credit card billing.

This resolves the frustration of figuring out how your order charges were separated.

    Teddi · at

    Great tip, Bubba. That’s another good way to look it up.

      Erin Murphy · at

      But this doesn’t show which line items are subject to sales tax. It DRIVES ME NUTS that they just put the sales tax in a lump sum at the bottom. I am surprised that isn’t causing them trouble with some regulatory body.

      Adam Hawkes · at

      This tip is honestly the real answer that readers are looking for. Please update your article to include this tip within the main text.

        Teddi · at

        Good idea, Adam. I updated the post with new screenshots to reflect this “Transactions” dropdown option.

    Ethan S. · at

    This is good but still problematic because how does one know which “order details” to look at, when there are several or maybe even many, many? The system is fraught with problems, as there is simply no seamless, annoyance-free way to reconcile a charge on the credit card statement with what one sees on the Amazon orders page and its offspring.

      Teddi · at

      Totally agree with you, Ethan! I’ve given them that feedback almost every time I interact with them on this topic. Why they don’t make it easy for people to reconcile their statements is beyond me. This month I found one order broken into two random-looking charges (on the same day, so it wasn’t a shipping separately issue) that didn’t match any one item in the order. Made no sense at all. Well, I hope some of these tips helped!

Pat Rad · at

I’d love to just get the invoices emailed to me, so then when I am reconciling my CC, I can just search my email for the amount. Anyone know if it’s possible to do this? I’m always going back and clicking all the invoices to find the right one. .

    Teddi · at

    I hear you, Pat. When Amazon ships something, I do get an email with the total amount charged for that package (not the whole order, just what shipped). So perhaps it could work that way? I don’t recall searching my emails for the charge amount itself. I’m usually browsing my Order History on their website when I reconcile statements. If that doesn’t work, downloading the CSV “order history reports” file seems like our best bet.

      Stephen Bronstein · at

      My strategy is, in fact, to search Gmail for the $ amount of the charge, since that is in the shipment notice from Amazon. Works like a charm, but a bit annoying when there are multiple Amazon accounts purchasing on the same cc (mine and my wife’s).

        Teddi · at

        Oooh, I’ll try that next time. If the emails include the specific charge amount that shows on the credit card statement (while the order summary online doesn’t), that could go a lot quicker than downloading order reports. Thanks, Stephen!

      Mike · at

      Thanks to STEPHEN BRONSTEIN (January 20, 2018 at 3:50 pm) for the suggestion to search my email from Amazon for the exact charges for each shipment. That’s solved a problem for me – that amount from my bank did NOT appear in Amazon’s downloaded reports file. The line in their reports file has the item+tax amount, but not the amount after they subtracted a gift card, so I was totally puzzled about this charge. But the email gives the item amount, the est’d tax, and subtracts the gift card. Phew!

Sarah · at

Great! worked like a charm.

Henry Watts · at

So, read this with interest (and much appreciate the work put into the analysis and the writeup), but it doesn’t solve the problems I’m having with Amazon billing.

In my case it often happens than an order gets broken up. *And* sometimes parts of orders get combined with other orders. *And*, apparently, when Amazon bills they group up all several charges for that day, often from different orders but each being just a part of it’s original order, and they bill that. Which is not a number traceable to *anything* in their system, as far as I can tell.

It seems to me that one should be able to look at a credit card statement and know why charges are on there. How else to tell whether someone is abusing your card or making a mistake. To do this I save all receipts when receipts are given.

To try to solve the Amazon puzzle I have taken to logging every time I get a shipment notice (or “receipt”) from Amazon that shows the $ charged for that shipment. You’d think this would tie to the credit card statement. Sadly it doesn’t because items shown on separate receipts may be lumped together on charges and, sometimes, items shown together on the “receipt” will show up on the credit card statement as more than one entry.

In fairness, I haven’t found them in error. But it bugs the heck out of me to have to go through all this effort to verify what’s going on.

I find it hard to believe they are running such a massive business without clear traceability from product/service to credit card amount.

If anyone else has gone this deep I’d love to hear how you get better data or arrange that things are clear

    Adrian · at

    This post basically covers the simple mysteries.

    The more perplexing mysteries are when your Amazon order report (for a single item, shipped by itself) shows an amount of $14.42, but the invoice for that order shows $13.14, and the credit card statement shows $13.11.

    It’s like they’re actively trying to frustrate people who actually try to reconcile their accounts.

Teddi · at

Thanks for sharing your experience, Hank. Have you found that downloading the order reports (in scenario 1 above) helps clarify, or not?

I’m really curious about your description of your ordering habits. Putting in multiple orders per day, and for enough disparate items that they end up in different shipment batches and different order summaries. Do you do this as part of a business? Or do you just rely heavily on Amazon for your everyday grocery and household needs?

Not trying to pry, I’m just wondering whether you fall outside the typical “Amazon.com customer” profile. Maybe their system isn’t geared to handle the pattern of activity you perform?

I only run into the problems I outlined in this article maybe 1-3 times a year. Not very often (which is partially why I documented it here, because enough time passes that I forget how I tracked it down last time).

Thanks for chiming in, and I do hope someone with more answers comes along to comment and enlighten both of us.

Henry Watts · at

Teddi,

The order (and Item) reports do not help. I can already see that detail in my order history, though the reports are certainly a cleaner look at things.

The first problem is that they expect you to keep track of how they have split orders up for shipping…so one has to log *every* notice you get as to the amount and what it’s for. If there were no other problem, an *if* those notices actually listed the items being shipped, then that would be a receipt and we’d be OK. However, there are other problems and you have to go to the website to see what is in the order. Boo, hiss.

The second problem is that they don’t actually bill as they state on those notices. For example, a shipment that contains pieces of two orders may *state* that this shipment is $31.24, but may produce two different charge-card entries, and not necessarily together on the charge-card statement.

The third problem that I’ve identified is that they *combine* charges into a larger number. These combined charges may reflect part of one order, all of another, part of third. They will have all been *shipped* on the same day, but they could have been ordered at vastly different times, so it’s hard to pull apart what’s going on.

It’s not that I’m putting in multiple orders per day (though that has happened on rare occasion). But Amazon bills as they *ship* and one might have ordered some things on Monday, some other things on Wednesday and other things on Saturday and some pieces of all this will all ship on the following Tuesday…

The items don’t have to be disparate to be shipped separately, they just have to be in separate warehouses. As far as I can tell, some things (heavy movers) are stocked in multiple warehouses, but other things are in just one or two places. Also, a *lot* of stuff comes from Amazon vendors, not out of Amazon warehouses.

This is not part of a business, but I’m have a number of different hobbies and I’ve gotten weary of local stores not having that exact thing I need, so I’m buying a fair amount on Amazon.

I don’t know how far outside of their typical profile I fall. But whatever that, it seems completely unreasonable that they put charges on the credit card and even they have a very tough time figuring out where those charges came from, which to to say, what they were for and how they are justified. It seems to me you’d want that part to be crystal clear.

I believe you have my email. If you’d care to email me, I’ll share with you the spreadsheet I’ve created as a result of this discussion. I’m going to track this craziness at a slightly deeper level and have another try to at getting Amazon to pay attention to this problem.

/hank

    Nancy · at

    I am having these exact same problems. I work at a school where the director orders from one Amazon account for 30 different school teachers. (He’s the one with the credit card.) It’s a nightmare. Please let me know if you have figured a work-around for this.

    Stacey · at

    This is the absolute worse process. Trying to reconcile amazon purchases. I appreciate all you and any advice you have to do this. The numbers are always different and I don’t know if there are taxes or not. There just needs to be a clean way to reconcile. I told the amazon customer service that and got hung up on.
    This is almost as annoying as dealing with your television service every year.

      Teddi · at

      I’ve given them that feedback almost every time I interact with them on this topic, Stacey. Totally agree. Why they don’t make it easy for people to reconcile their statements is beyond me. I hope some of these tips helped!

    Julie · at

    I’ve been reading the comments and can barely contain myself.

    I’ve been so frustrated because I have a big family with various aged children that watch amazon prime movies, rent & purchase and even subscribe to channels (like Showtime, etc.) I also buy some kindle books and digital content (Apps) on our kindle devices, so when I look at my bank statements I have no idea what MOST of the charges are for. The shipped items I can usually identify pretty quickly but I have anywhere from 5 – 10 different charges per month that I don’t know what they are for.

    I used to have a similar problem with Apple when we had an AppleTV and several iPhone & iPad devices. But Apple has a GREAT solution, you have to go to their website and look under purchase history where they have a list of everything you’ve ever paid them for including subscriptions, iTunes content, etc. plus they list WHAT it was for. . So I’m able to check and make sure there’s no unauthorized use of my credit card and I can see if any of the kids are buying videos or games without permission. I even discovered a subscription to a service I thought I had cancelled OVER a year before but it was still going strong.

    When I found out how to get ALL of my purchase history from Apple, I had several things that I was able to take care and quit wasting money.

    I just don’t understand why Amazon can’t do the same thing.

    It’s hard for me to believe that they are able to run a business and charge your CCard over and over each week with no REAL solid accountability.

    I hope that makes sense. I’m real tired tonight but I just couldn’t wait to respond … You’ve done a great job explaining and updating all of this information.

      Teddi · at

      I agree completely, Julie. It seems so strange that they can operate this way. Even the emails that I save so I can search more easily are missing the basic information that a true “receipt” should include, like *what* was purchased. I hope you find something that works for you and your family!

Steve B · at

Henry, I feel your pain. We live 20+ miles from shopping so use Amazon quite a bit.

Here is my solution:
-Download the ITEMS report from the ORDER HISTORY REPORTS.
-Open in EXCEL.
-Sort the report on the Shipment Date Column. (I usually delete columns I don’t need to see to make the worksheet easier to work with)

You will now see the items shipped on each date. Use Autosum to get the total for each date in an adjacent blank column. The total of those items should match you CC statement. (Billing date will usually be a day later than ship date).

Note: Kindle items do not show and Reward Points used are not accounted for so still a little sleuthing may be required.

    Teddi · at

    Thanks for sharing your insights, Steve!

A Moos · at

Whenever possible, I try to suggest to Amazon customer service that they add the following feature: a way to click on any payment method and see a history of transactions, sorted by date and associated amazon order id.

This would be ideal imho. It’s so logical, I can’t believe they don’t have this already. The downloadable report is not exactly a list of payments (although it’s better than nothing). If they had this transaction list, then matching your cc statement to your Amazon acct would be a cinch.

    Henry Watts · at

    It is stunning that they don’t do this. It’s the only charge that hits my credit card that doesn’t have a clear explanation.

    And since it seems so very unbusinesslike and unlike the excellent way Amazon does many things, I can only conclude that it’s quite intentional, which pisses me off even more. I can’t figure out *why* they’d want to do this, though.

      Cassie Ogle · at

      They don’t want you to figure out how much money you are spending on their site. That’s why it’s so difficult to reconcile. “Keep spending, we will take your money, keep spending money, thank you for your money.”

      Amazon is in the business to make money. Bottom line. They only provide good customer service so that you continue to spend money there.

    Amanda · at

    This is extremely frustrating. I am trying to reconcile due to a number of my subscribe and save items going missing (half I could replace, half I had to get returns on) the order history report that is exported to Excel would be excellent for this if they gave you the ACTUAL price you paid. Instead it’s the original price (before any coupons/s&s discounts) so NEVER matches up with my credit card statement. It’s so frustrating. It’s almost impossible to click back and forth through your orders to try to reconcile anything. I just want to make sure I am not getting double charged and am getting the proper refunds. Ugh.

      Teddi · at

      I totally feel your frustration, Amanda! I noticed recently that the Order Reports aren’t easy to find unless you search their help. Here’s a link, for anyone reading the comments: https://www.amazon.com/gp/b2b/reports/ It’s annoying that it’s so difficult to get basic information. Be sure to try the different types of reports. The “orders and shipments” report actually has the amount they charged. They have a “refunds” report, too. Hope this helps!

Mark · at

I agree that Amazon reconciliation is one of the worst out there. So many other vendors do it better. With that said, be aware that some charges on your credit card may be 3rd party using Amazon Pay and those will NOT appear as on order or item in your Amazon account…thus, you will never find it there. Those vendors are just using the Amazon payment processor – it’s not an order with Amazon itself. Many times you will see something like “AMZ* amzn.com/pmts” on your credit card bill.

    Teddi · at

    Excellent tip, Mark. Thanks for your contribution!

G Bentley · at

I am completely new to Amazon but have run into this living nightmare. At a new job i have accounting all over me to produce receipts for the amounts hitting the credit card with the tax break down, not each item price with the total of the whole invoice. I’ve spent 2 days looking at everything and even after calling Amazon have yet to find a resolution. Worst part is according to accounting the person who used to do the ordering was able to provide what was needed but no-one knows how…

    Teddi · at

    Have you tried downloading the order history reports? There’s one for “Items” and one for “Orders and Shipments”, and both reports seem to include columns for tax charged on each item.

Vizou · at

I am hoping that Amazon will allow us to add a reference to each order/item (example, Business Expense) that would help identify which order a split charge comes from…

Rory · at

The way amazon bills drives me nuts and has done for years. I buy for both myself but also my business and I need to be able to properly assess and tabulate what I buy. This is an international problem as I’m in the UK. Unlike any other transaction on my card/s which I can easily verify I have to go through a load of malarky. I am grateful for the tips but really it would help if there was an easy way for amazon to provide an exact tally of thier charges to my card with a drop down of what the charge is for, they have the info why cant it be tabulated for those that like to check what they have paid for… surely for a FAANG company this cannot be hard?

Paul · at

I have just spent the last hour helping my Mum *try* and reconcile her debit card statement to here numerous Xmas present purchases on amazon.co.uk (not something I do..). Google search led me here, but outside of the US there does not seem to be a way for non-business customers to download transactions.

The only way I found was to use this chrome extension (which works in the US as well)

https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/amazon-order-history-repo/mgkilgclilajckgnedgjgnfdokkgnibi

Still, it is disturbingly difficult to match card payments to purchases. I see seemingly random amounts charged to the card that do not match amazon purchases. Seems to me the scope for fraud here is great…

Amazon seems to use a string of characters as a reference in the payment description (like “M23AF3T34”) – has anyone been able to decode this and match it to an amazon item purchase?

    Teddi · at

    Thanks for the link to the extension, Paul. That looks useful! As for the string of characters, I hope someone may come along and chime in with an answer at some point. Truly, Amazon is falling down on the customer service job with their system. They recently removed the price from the list of past digital orders — you have to click EACH ONE to see the price on a second screen. This is highly annoying to me, because I purchase multiple digital items per month and would like to more easily attribute those purchases in my home accounting by scanning down the list and matching amounts on my credit card statement with the items (business books, kids books, music, movies, etc). And you can’t download an order report for digital orders. Sigh. Maybe the extension you shared will help with that. We’ll see…

    Charles Blaquière · at

    I was just online, chatting with Amazon customer support. The agent wrote, “on our end we actually don’t have the option to determine which ref number is associated to an order because we actually have different reference number that is showing on our system.”

    This is sad; I, too, would like to easily identify Amazon purchases based on the reference number appearing on CC transactions.

Scott · at

Thanks for the great tips! Usually I could figure out 90% of the charges from looking at the Orders page (the header for each order) – but the amounts are no longer shown there! They also used to show the payment method (I use more than one card) but that stopped a while back. Two steps backwards…

Bill · at

Thank you so much for posting this! Reconciling Amazon orders has been abysmal, but the solution was as simple as viewing the invoice. A great weight has lifted… 🙂

Rachel · at

I absolutely can’t thank you enough!!!

Nancy F · at

THANK YOU
Now I don’t feel like such a weirdo because I like to reconcile! I kept thinking we were going to read a story about major embezzlement at Amazon because they seemingly never have to balance. The email tip and searching by the dollar amount ended up being life-altering also I hadn’t noticed the digital tab at the top left on the orders page. Also the kindle newstand subscription button under Account/Accounts & Subscriptions YAY!!! Thank you so much

e · at

Oh. My. Gosh. Thank you so much for the CSV download tip!!! I try to reconcile my YNAB as often as possible but with Amazon charges it can get very intimidating. This helped me troubleshoot a pesky charge. YAY!

Marcy · at

Thank you! This was really helpful. I ordered 25 books and they all shipped to separate addresses so my invoice shows 1 charge but I need to reconcile 25 different charges. PDF printing 25 emails would have taken forever. Thanks again.

    Teddi · at

    So glad this tip is still helping people!

Cara · at

Am I the only one who does NOT see “Download order reports” anywhere on the orders history page?

Can someone provide a direct link? Thanks

    Teddi · at

    You’re not alone, Cara. The order reports download is NOT on the orders history page. You have to go to My Account and it’s on that page. I updated the article above with a more current screenshot. Not sure a direct link would work, as they change their URLs all the time and you have to be logged in. Hope this helps!

      Mike · at

      It would also be useful if they used the same name for the reports everywhere on their site. The page title is Order History Reports but the link, as Teddi says, is Download order reports. I also don’t see an option for an items report any longer (vs Teddi’s advice June 14, 2018 at 3:42 pm). Or can such a thing be accessed from a different direction?

        Teddi · at

        Mike, I still see the Items option on my Order History Reports page. It’s part of the “Report Type” dropdown menu when you specify the parameters of the report. Mine shows the following Report Types:

        Items
        Orders and Shipments
        Refunds
        Returns

        See the second graphic in the blog post above for a screenshot of it.

          Mike · at

          Sheesh. Well maybe I need new glasses. Skimmed right over that pull-down menu option.

Mike · at

Here’s more info I just got from an interaction with Amazon customer service. The charges shown on the Order History Report do not always match actual charges (to the bank). In particular, they can differ from the charged amounts shown at the bottom of the invoice. Unfortunately, I have an email from Amazon that matched an amount shown on the OHR. But my bank reported a charge that matched the invoice. I hadn’t gone so far as to check every invoice in the period in question, thinking that the OHR would identify the actual charges (and would match the invoices). I suggested to the rep that they make these records match each other (invoice and OHR). I also suggested charged amounts should match shipment rows on the invoices, which would allow tying taxes to payments. (The invoice I’m looking at is older, and shows actual charges (at the bottom of the page) that don’t match shipment rows’ totals.) I also mentioned my problem with a gift card amount causing a difference between the OHR amount and what was actually charged (shown in an email, correctly, for which I’m grateful). There’s also the problem mentioned by someone above, which the rep called “clubbing”, where “two shipments might have shipped out together”. I’m guessing that means there might be a mix-and-match in a warehouse, combining parts of multiple orders? But if charges never combined multiple orders’ parts, I’d think this wouldn’t be hard to accomplish. At worst, I’d get multiple charges for the total of what came in one box, but the charges would belong to different orders, so I could easily track back to my submitted order(s). I’m a system developer; it’ll be “interesting” to see what new bugs get introduced while they’re fixing these.

Mark · at

Thanks — this gave me exactly the information I was looking for! It is very cumbersome to try scroll through the amazon.com order history pages, especially now that it seems they don’t include the dates on those pages (at least some of the times), so sometimes there’s a lot of digging to do

Britton · at

OMG! You are a rock star 🙂 Thank you so much for this article Teddi Deppner! You can’t imagine how much time you’ve saved in my QB reconciliation for the company every month. I figured there had to be a better way, and finally gave up and searched today. So glad to have found this 🙂

R Geertsen · at

This is SO helpful – you’ve solved the frustration of trying to reconcile what shows up on the bank statement to what I thought it cost!

    Teddi · at

    Glad it helped you!

Teri · at

Wow, I still don’t see the “Download Order Reports” selection under Your Account. My list goes from Manage your lists to 1-Click settings, nothing in between like your screen shot.

    Teddi · at

    You’re right, Teri! Thanks for pointing that out. The option to download order reports doesn’t appear anymore on the Account page. I’ve updated the article to remove the confusing screenshot. You have to access the reports via the Help pages now, so here’s a direct link to save you that step: https://www.amazon.com/gp/b2b/reports/

      Chris Jordan · at

      Look like they may have removed that option altogether now. That url just takes me to my regular orders page.

        Teddi · at

        Thanks for the heads-up, Chris! I’ve updated the post with the latest from Amazon. One of their reps shared a new link to a new kind of report download. Sadly, it’s much delayed (unknown whether it will take a few hours like the rep said, or up to a month like the web page warned). Still, I’m glad to get the feedback so I could update this post.

HEATHER · at

Thank you simplified my budgeting be 80%!

Theresa Augustyniak · at

Thank you so very much for this detailed and profoundly helpful post! You have saved me countless tears and hours of frustration!!

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